Daredevils of Niagara Falls - A Comprehensive History of the Falls, the People & the Places
H O M E
Over The Falls
Annie Taylor
Bobbie Leach
Charles G. Stephens
Jean Albert Lussier
George A. Stathakis
Red Hill Jr.
William Fitzgerald aka Nathan Boya
Karel Soucek
Steve Trotter
John (Dave) Munday
Jeffrey (Clyde) Petkovich and Peter DeBernardi
Jessie Sharp
John (Dave) Munday (second trip)
Steve Trotter (a second time) and Lori Martin
Robert “Bob” Overacker
Kirk Jones


Tightrope Walkers
Clifford Calverly
Blondin
The Great Farini
Maria Spelterina
Steve Peere
Samuel John Dixon
Henry Balleni

Henri Rechatin

Shooting the Rapids
Carlisle Graham
Capt. Joel Robinson
George Hazlett & Sadie Allen
Martha E. Wagenfuhrer
Maud Willard
Red Hill Sr

Swimming the Rapids
Captain Matthew Webb
William Kendall

Stunters
Sam Patch

Lincoln Beachey

The Maid of the Mist
The History of the Maid of the Mist
The Legend of the Maid of the Mist

Miracles at the Falls
The Roger Woodward Story
The Old Scow

Ice Bridges
Tragedy at the Falls

Niagara Falls Bridges
The Early Bridges
Collapse of the Fallsview Bridge
The Second Fallsview Bridge
The Queenston-Lewiston Bridge
The Rainbow Bridge
The Whirlpool Bridge

Historical Niagara
The History of the Falls
The First Inhabitants
European Discovery
The War of 1812
Navy Island
The Early Tourist Trade
North America's First Museum
The Burning Springs
The Schooner Michigan

The Spanish Aerocar
Dufferin Islands

Incline Railways
Prospect Park Incline Railway
Whirlpool Rapids Incline
Falls Incline Railway

 



 


Charles G. Stephens
DAREDEVIL 3

The first daredevil to lose his life going over the falls was Charles Stephens. Stephens, a barber with eleven children, hoped that the fame and fortune that such a stunt would bring would help to alleviate his family from poverty. He was gravely mistaken.

Early on the morning of July 11th, 1920 he began his journey. Charles G. Stephens was the first daredevil to lose his life going over the falls.

Stephens, a 58 year old barber with eleven children, hoped that the fame and fortune that such a stunt would bring would help to alleviate his family from poverty. He was gravely mistaken.

Early on the morning of July 11th, 1920 he began his journey. Stephens had built a massive wooden barrel for the trip over the falls.

Thousands watched that morning in July as Stephens barrel crested over the falls and then within seconds broke into pieces upon impact at the base of the Horseshoe Falls.

Stephens had made a fatal mistake of attaching an anvil to his feet. All that was found of Mr. Stephens was his arm, identified by a number of tattoos, still strapped into the harness. The Mighty Niagara had claimed it’s first daredevil!

 
Charles Stephens poses inside his barrel that would carry him to his death.

 

 

 

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